Íslenskir radíóamatörar, ÍRA.

About ÍRA

ÍRA was founded on August 14, 1946. ÍRA is the national associaton of Icelandic radio amateurs and is recognized as such with the Post and Telecom Administration in Iceland. ÍRA is a member of the IARU, Region 1, and the Nordic Associaton of Amateur societies, NRAU. The association celebrated its 65 anniversary in 2011.

Meetings

Meetings are held once a week on Thursdays between 20:00-22:00 at ÍRA headquarters in Skeljanes street in Reykjavík. Anybody interested in amateur radio is welcome to visit. The Skeljanes street has the position: 64° 07′ 33″ N – 21° 56′ 58″ W. Locator is HP94ad,14 km’s from the south end and 2.5 km’s from the west end of the grid area. Bus route number 12 terminates outside headquarters.

The Executive Committee 2016 – 2017
President Jon Th. Jonsson TF3JA
Vice President Oskar Sverrisson TF3DC
Secretary Olvir S. Sveinsson TF3WZ
Treasurer Einar Kjartansson TF3EK
Board Member Johannes Hermannsson TF3NE
The general E-mail address for ÍRA is: ira@ira.is

Letters and QSL Cards to the TF QSL Bureau should be addressed to the following address:

Íslenskir Radíóamatörar, ÍRA
Pósthólf 1058
IS-121 Reykjavík
Iceland

E-mail: ira@ira.is


Welcome to the website of Icelandic Radio Amateurs, ÍRA.

To celebrate the 70th anniversary of Icelandic radio amateurs (IRA) in 2016 the Post and Telecom Administration (PTA) has authorized all TF stations use the prefix TF70 in 2016. As an example TF3IRA can operate as TF70IRA. IRA the national society was founded August 14th 1946.

1. Icelandic Radio Amateurs

The association of Icelandic Radio Amateurs, ÍRA, was founded in 1946. The ÍRA functions equally as a radio club and as a national IARU / IARU Region 1 / NRAU radio amateur association. In Icelandic regulation for radio amateurs, the ÍRA is given an official advisory role and liaison, between Icelandic licensees and the Post and Telecommunication Administration in Iceland, PTA.

2. PTA Liaison

Maintaining a close relationship with the PTA is one of ÍRA’s highest priorities. Among tangible results are:

  • Joint semi-annual to annual meetings between ÍRA and the PTA, discussing amateur radio issues.
  • Now for decades ÍRA has composed and conducted amateur radio examinations in Iceland on behalf of the PTA.
  • Secondary privileges on the following bands: (1) 5.260-5.410 MHz; (2) 70.000-70.200 MHz; and (3) 1850-1900 kHz (in certain international contests).
  • Exchange of notes between ÍRA and the PTA prior to the WRC-2012 conference, in which support of the Icelandic delegation was secured for the 472-479 kHz new band segment at the conference. Icelandic radio amateurs received the new band on January 16, 2013.
3. International Liaison

As member of the IARU / IARU Region 1 / NRAU, ÍRA seeks to be as active in the international radio amateur arena as possible for such a small society of limited means.

4. National Society Activities

To mention but a few of the local national society activities:

  • Of major importance is our magazine, CQ TF, which is published quarterly.
  • By the same token, the society’s web page (www.ira.is) is actively maintained in order to fulfill the members’ need for the latest amateur radio news.
  • Amateur radio courses and examinations are given 1-2 times per annum.
  • ÍRA established for the first time an EMC committee in 2011. The committee will seek a close relationship with specialized bodies of other national societies and the EMC coordinator.
  • ÍRA was the 2nd society in the world to translate and publish ON4UN’s “Ethics and Operating Procedures for the Radio Amateur” in 2009. The publication was (and continues to be) distributed free to members.
  • QSL Bureau.
5. Club Activities

A few of the club activities are:

  • Our headquarters in Reykjavík are open to our members and those interested in amateur radio, once a week. Facilities are provided to sit down with a cup of coffee and look at the latest amateur radio magazines. Many also bring their outgoing QSL cards and check for incoming cards, as the IRA QSL Bureau is located there.
  • Our club station TF3IRA is QRV on HF, VHF and UHF (including satellites) and is open to licensed members, and in weekends for activating the station in international contests. Also run in contests as TF3W.
  • The society offers an ambitious program of lectures and seminars that are given each year from February to May and from October to December. The total number of such events exceeds 40 per annum.
  • ÍRA owns and runs VHF repeaters in around the country and has an APRS digi-peater located at its headquarters in Reykjavík.
  • The society sponsors a TF Field day which is held annually in early August. This event first took place in 1979. A separate annual VHF field day was started in July, 2012.
  • For a number of years the society has actively supported participation in the annual International Lighthouse Lightship Weekend.
  • The Society supports CW code practice transmissions that are offered three days a week on 80 meters.
  • A new activity for 2013 is a code proficiency test, to be offered twice a year.
6. VHF repeaters

See “Repeaters and frequencies” for further information.

Reykjavík (the capital): TF3RPC (1)
Bláfjöll (mountain, near Reykjavík): TF1RPB (2)
Skálafell (mountain, near Reykjavík): TF3RPA
Búrfell (mountain, east from Reykjavík): TF1RPE
Garðskagi (near Keflavík International Airport): TF8RPH (3)
Akureyri (in the north of Iceland): TF5RPD

(1) Not QRV as of February 14, 2013 due to construction on the site.
(2) Tone access needed as of September 9, 2012; CTCSS 88,5 Hz.
(3) Not QRV as of September 9, 2012 due to lack of equipment.

7. Beacon on 6 meters, status March 2017: not operational

Beacon TF1SIX QRG 50.057 MHz is QRV from locator: HP94sc.

An EchoLink, is run by TF3GW in Reykjavík on QRG 145.325 MHz, node number: 283634.

9. Local calling frequencies
2 Meters FM on 145.500 MHz
70 Centimeters FM on 433.500 MHz
80 Meters SSB on 3637 KHz
80 Meters MORSE on 3640 KHz at 21:00 most evnings
10. APRS

An APRS interest group runs 144.800 APRS at four sites in and around Reykjavik, further development of the APRS is planned.


Operating in Iceland

Information for visiting Radio Amateurs – SOTA in Iceland.

1. Visitors with a valid Amateur Radio license from CEPT countries

(A) A Radio Amateur from a CEPT country who has a licence that equals the requirements of the CEPT license as is layed out in ECC Recommendation T/R 61-01 does not need to have a special license issued by the Icelandic government if he/she comes to Iceland for a short visit. As long as the visitors license in his home country does not run out, the person can operate when in Iceland for a period of up to 3 months. Should the period of stay exceed 3 months, the licensee can apply for an Icelandic callsign. In such a case, his home country needs to have ratified ECC Recommendation T/R 61-02. A special application form needs to be used and there is a fee.

(B) If the radio amateur holds a valid novice license and comes from a CEPT country, his country needs to have ratified ECC/REC 05-06 in order for the licensee in question to be able to operate in Iceland.

(C) In all cases, CEPT licensees should only use the TF prefix in front of their call signs, but not the TF prefix with an Icelandic call area number. For example: TF/HB9XXX would thus be correct; but TF6/HB9XXX incorrect.

2. Visitors with a valid Amateur Radio license from countries which have implemented the T/R 61-01

(A) Radio Amateurs with a valid license from any of the following countries can operate in Iceland if the license in question equals the requirements for the CEPT license. They need not have a special license issued by the Icelandic government if he/she comes to Iceland for a short visit. As long as the visitors license in his home country does not run out, the person can operate when in Iceland for a period of up to 3 months. Should the period of stay exceed 3 months, the licensee can apply for an Icelandic callsign. In such a case, his home country needs to have ratified ECC Recommendation T/R 61-02. A special application form needs to be used and there is a fee.

The Radio Amateur from any of the following countries needs to be sure that his/her license meets the standard of equivalence as is set out in Annex IV of “ECC Recommendation T/R 61-01”.

  • Australia.
  • Canada.
  • Israel.
  • Netherlands Antilles (i.e. Bonaire, Curacao, St. Eustatius, Saba and St. Maarten).
  • New Zealand.
  • Peru.
  • South Africa.
  • United States.

(B) If the radio amateur comes from one of the countries mentioned above and holds a valid “novice license” (or equivalent), his country needs to have ratified ECC/REC 05-06 in order for the licensee in question to be able to operate in Iceland. In the case of The United States, this license is “General class license”.

(C): Licensees from these countries should only use the TF prefix in front of their call signs, but not the TF prefix with an Icelandic call area number. For example: TF/W1XXX would thus be correct; but TF6/W1XXX incorrect.

3. Visitors with a valid Amateur Radio license from other countries

Radio Amateurs with a valid license from a country that has neither adopted the CEPT Agreement or with which there is nor a reciprocal agreement, need to obtain a special permit from the authorities to operate in Iceland. To be able to obtain a special permit from the authorities, the licensee needs to demonstrate that his/her license fulfills the minimum requirements deemed satisfactory by the Icelandic PTA. Applicants should allow ample time for the processing of requests of this nature and follow these steps:

  1. Fill out the relevant application forms from the Post and Telecom Administration.
  2. Include an unequivocal confirmation of the validity and class of your licence together with power and bands allowed.
  3. A copy of your licence and licensing conditions certified by a notary public (clear copies).
  4. A statement by your licensing authority.
  5. A statement by your national IARU society.

Kindly return your application to the PTA with the stipulated licensing fee, as instructed by the authority.

4. Importing Amateur Radio equipment to Iceland

Customs should not be a problem. However, if there is as problem, you can ask the customs officer to contact Mr. Hördur R. Hardarson at the Icelandic PTA, Póst- og fjarskiptastofnun. Please note that the ECC Recommendation T/R 61-01 does not cover custom regulations pertaining to Amateur Radio equipment in any way.